Posts Tagged ‘welfare reform’

Changes to #PiP affecting those with mental health issues

6 March 2017

 

CarerWatch are outraged that once again the Government is proposing changes to Personal Independence Payment (PiP).   
These changes would affect over 160,000 people with mental health problems.

We are extremely anxious of the knock on effect this would have to family carers in receipt of Carers Allowance for those affected. This double whammy would have grave consequences on the income of many families, that are already suffering with disproportionate cuts to benefits and social care.

(more…)

Chamber debate on #carers Thurs June 9th – #CarersWeek

8 June 2016

On Thursday 9 June, MPs will take part in a debate in the House of Commons Chamber on carers. This debate was recommended by the Backbench Business Committee following a representation from Mims Davies MP.

Invisible 3 (Small)

 

This debate will be opened by Mims Davies, Conservative MP for Eastleigh

Watch the debate and read the transcript

Transcripts of proceedings in the Commons Chamber are available three hours after they happen in Today’s Commons Debates.

Digital Debate

From Monday 6 June members of the public can inform the Backbench Business debate by joining the conversation on the Carers Week Facebook page at www.facebook.com/carersweek.

Backbench Business Committee

The Backbench Business Committee meets weekly on Tuesdays to consider requests for debates from any backbench Members of Parliament on any subject.

The Committee then has to decide how to allocate the limited Parliamentary time it has at its disposal. The Committee’s meetings are always conducted in public and can be watched on Parliament TV.

copied from  Parliament site

 

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Reverse the Employment Support Allowance disability benefit cut

13 March 2016

ScissorsPLEASE SIGN THIS PETITION, THEN SHARE AS WIDE AS POSSIBLE

The House of Lords has been unable to stop a planned £30-a-week cut to disability benefits forced through by Government MPs. This will cripple those in receipt of these benefits, leaving many in literal poverty.

The government must reverse this decision. Lives are at risk.

Sign this petition HERE

 

 

Will Iain Duncan Smith turn up for Welfare Debate

4 May 2015

welfare debate

 

Twitter users  –   #WelfareDebate15

Tuesday May 5th Daily Politics debate

BBC2    2pm

BBC Parliament  9.00pm

BBC News  9.30pm

Presenters  Andrew Neil and Alison Holt

Participants

Iain Duncan Smith  Conservative

Rachel Reeves            Labour

Steve Webb                  LibDems

Suzanne Evans           UKIP

Jonathan Bartley       Green Party

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Non-attendance (see below) recently by the purveyors of welfare reform suggests that they deem themselves to be unaccountable for their actions.

Will Mr Smith attend this debate or will the quiet man become the invisible man AGAIN

Iain Duncan Smith fails to show up for General Election hustings in his own constituency

Britain asks: where is David Cameron?

Wirral West MP Esther McVey pulls out of live radio interview in Liverpool city centre

‘Ashamed’ Tories quit Newsnight welfare debate at the last moment

Many disabled people and carers will be watching this show. They have borne the brunt of these cuts and are living in dread of the prospect of the further £12billion cuts to welfare promised by the Conservatives.

Daily Politics – Welfare Debate Tues 5th May

20 April 2015

welfare debate

 

Tuesday May 5th Daily Politics debate

BBC2    2pm

BBC News  8.30pm

Presenters  Andrew Neil and Alison Holt

Participants

Iain Duncan Smith  Conservative

Rachel Reeves            Labour

Steve Webb                  LibDems

Suzanne Evans           UKIP

Jonathan Bartley       Green Party

 

 

Welfare Ceasefire

13 April 2015

 

This coming week until April 16th we would like to ask all our supporters to sign up to our Thunderclap.

ceasefire

Many have already done so, but let’s give it a real push to send a clear message to all political parties to call a ceasefire on welfare reforms.

These reforms are causing horrendous distress and causing many to unfairly lose out on money they could be entitled too because they have been rushed through ,and thus far 158,300 have been wrongly found fit for work,1300 died while looking for work by this brutal system  and to our absolute horror 68 died while appealing. This has to be stopped! These deaths have to caused considerable harm and distress to those who are no longer with us and their families. The WCA has already been found to be (more…)

Carers deserve a livable income

1 April 2015

With many thanks to those that added their name in support of this letter to the Guardian.

If you wish to add your support please add your name in the comments section

What does Carers Allowance mean to you ?  again leave a comment.

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Family carers are among the most responsible members of society. CarerWatch, along with others, believes suggestions made in recent leaked documents of moving carers to universal credit would result in an unfair system that gives no recognition whatsoever of the contribution carers make to society.

DWPCarerWatch believes that governments should accept their responsibility to carers. Carers deserve a livable income, a separate benefit which recognises that they are not unemployed or “passive” recipients of benefit but are making an important contribution to society.

Those in receipt of carer’s allowance cannot be classed as being inactive. Carers are unique within the benefit system in that they have to (more…)

Employment Support allowance ‘easier to claim’ – joke

10 September 2014

CarerWatch and Pat’s Petition welcome the discussion on 5th September 2014 comparing the ease of access to ESA (Employment and Support Allowance) with access to the old IB (Incapacity Benefit).

ESA logo

However it is important to compare like with like. The new ESA is not equivalent to the old IB and they should not be compared directly. We would suggest that the new ESA Support Group alone should be considered as equivalent to the award of long term IB. If you compare these figures you will find that it is much harder to get in to the Support Group than it was to claim IB.

The ESA WRAG (Work Related Activity Group) is a temporary, time limited benefit, suitable for people with short term injuries or illnesses, who will get better and return to work within a year. It only lasts twelve months. It is the equivalent of the old short term IB.

We would also note other distortions to the figures including the time taken to process the initial application. If there is a short time to process, then all the short term injuries need to be counted, whereas with a longer processing period, these short term disabilities are gone before they are included.

We have pressed for a cumulative impact assessment of these changes and slowly we are seeing acknowledgement that this must be done . We cannot wait much longer.

We have always said that changes should not be brought in until the full effects are understood: they wouldn’t do this in any new transport system or construction plan so why are they allowed to experiment in this way on disabled people? .

There are many other issues involved in the comparisons – this needs serious analysis from professional and independent statisticians such as those at Sheffield Hallam University. This would all be part of a thorough cumulative impact assessment and we urge the government to ensure this is completed as a matter of urgency.

Frances Kelly

Pat Onions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We still need discuss the Elephant in the room

10 April 2014

 

Fit for work – but not fit to get a job

These last few weeks we have all been inundated with articles re Employment Support Allowance, Work Capability Assessments. From Atos announcing they were walking away from their contract, to a Work and Pensions committee evidence session held Weds 9th April. Available to watch here .

No one thinks that changing the provider will solve the problem

Mirror article here

Huffington Post here

So what is the real problem?

ATOS were asked to test disabled people and find out if they were fit for work.

Sadly being able to do some work is not the same thing as being able to get a job.

 

The real world out there is a competitive labour market. Employers hire the candidate who convinces them that they will be the most productive and stand up to the most pressure. The candidate who is the fittest, gets the job. That’s the real world of getting a job.

 

With thanks to Grace Collins

With thanks to Grace Collins

 

But what should an employer do when they are asked to take on a disabled person whose impairments will bring extra costs to the employer? No-one even asks the question. It’s the elephant in the room that no-one talks about. They’ll talk about reasonable adjustments and enabling people to overcome the barriers to being productive, but can that work for everyone?

 

Until we start asking these questions, we won’t find the solution. Governments intervene in markets all the time to promote equality: but apparently not for disabled people.

 

So let’s move the focus away from disabled people.

Stop blaming them and putting all the pressure on them to be fit for work when we know they need to be fit to get a job.

Let’s move the spotlight on to employers and the labour market out there in the real world. And look for solutions there.

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Counting the Cuts – Report Published

18 February 2014

Received from Simon Duffy – Director of the Centre for Welfare Reform

Counting the Cuts is a new report by Dr Simon Duffy, Director of the Centre for Welfare Reform. The report is based on analysis of the latest statistics from the Government.

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There have been large cuts in public spending, and these cuts have targeted on people who are already disadvantaged.

People on low incomes face cuts twice as large as average

Disabled people on low incomes face cuts four times larger than average

People who need help form social services face cuts six times greater than the average

This report is released in advance of (more…)


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