Posts Tagged ‘elderly’

Councils charging for support puts #carers wellbeing at risk

16 September 2015

From time to time, every carer needs support to help them look after the person they are caring for.

Sometimes that will mean getting equipment installed in their home so that they can meet the needs of the person they support. Other times it might mean calling in home help so that they can keep up with their housework.

pound signs

The importance of these services cannot be overstated. They mean that carers can provide the best support possible to their friend or family member whilst maintaining their own health.

read in full from CarersTrust

Short report can be read here     Full report here

 

 

 

 

Caring for parents and elderly relatives

4 March 2014

 

Womans Hour today discussed caring for parents.  You can listen to it here

Like it or not many of us are living longer and as we approach the end of our
lives, many of us  need more rather than less care.  Often it falls to the next
generation – the adult children, relatives, sometimes even neighbours or friends
– to pick up the reigns.  We’re looking at what happens when you’re called on to
provide this kind of care for parents and other relatives.

 

How involved are you? 

Are you able to share the responsibilities with your siblings or other
relatives?

What impact does caring for them have on your own life and other
family responsibilities. 

Have you thought about moving a parent in with you or perhaps moved into their home instead.  Or perhaps you’ve helped to move them
into some kind of sheltered accommodation or care home. 

We’re going to be exploring the other side of the coin too – how it feels to ask for help when living independently becomes a problem. Author Carol Lee joins Jane in the
studio. Her memoir Out of Winter, explore how she cared for her parents long
distance. We also hear from listeners and from Nel Hales, who is still
living independently at the age of one hundred.

 

 

To achieve success we must ALL take action – WoW Petition

17 February 2014

DOING NOTHING

hourglass2

 

The Coalition government have been relentless in their welfare reforms, cuts to services. Warnings taken to them time and time again have been ignored.  Many grassroot groups, charities, church leaders and  think tanks have taken numerous actions, in their attempts to show the reality of how many disabled people and carers are being hit disproportionately by the cuts to benefits and services.

YOU may be someone affected now

 It may be YOU next, if you suddenly become seriously ill/disabled and/or a family carer.

You may be campaign weary, wondering how much more you can give. However, we must always rise up that one more time than we  fall.

TAKE ACTION OR ACCEPT THE REFORMS – WHICH IS IT TO BE?

 

On Feb 27th 2014, there is to be a debate in the House of Commons. This was won by WoW petition team, and all their supporters. Full wording of the petition can be found here

It is vital as many MPs as possible attend, to participate in this debate and speak up on your behalf about how the reforms are impacting on your lives. 

Details how to contact your MP can be found here  

 

You will be able to watch the debate live on the day from approximately 11.30am, links will be provided nearer the time. Those on twitter will be using the hash-tag  #WowDebate2014

 

If you require further information, or want to inform WoW if your MP is/is not attending, please contact WoW team direct   info@wowpetition.com

 

 

 

Share your experience of Community Care Assessments – Survey

8 February 2014

 

The care system in the UK today is desperately under funded and not fit for purpose. Every day we hear of local authorities closing, withdrawing or cutting back on essential facilities and services. One of the areas causing great concerns is  Community Care Assessments .

CarerWatch are working with supportive MPs, and collecting evidence of how our members, and others, may be affected.

If you have experience of a Community Care Assessment, could you please complete this survey.

http://fluidsurveys.com/surveys/carerwatch/community-care-assessments/

Feel free to share with others.

We will also be doing a survey next on Carers’ Assessments too.

Any questions please contact admin@carerwatch.com

Many thanks

 

 

 

 

URGENT – CARERS DEBATE, contact your MP

18 June 2013

URGENT - CARERS DEBATE

Following Carers Week, a debate on carers will take place in the House of Commons on Thursday 20th June

Full details can be found here  and you will be able to watch it LIVE via this link

It is vital you contact your MP , ask them to attend – and raise any/all issues that you are concerned about. Time is of the essence, so it may be worth phoning their office and following up with an email outlining your worries.

Questions can be asked on benefits, juggling work and care, social care, support from the NHS and all the other policy areas which affect carers.

Please share this with family, friends, contacts. The more MPs we have there, the more issues that can get discussed.

Share via Facebook and Twitter too. Hashtag during the event will be #CarersDebate

URGENT - CARERS DEBATE

Is the government prepared to take action? Carers Week report

14 June 2013

Carers Week logoWhen the invite came to attend a speed-networking event in Parliament with MPs I initially said no. Doing a return trip from the North East in same day is not ideal, early start and extremely late arrival home, all for a 2-hour event. However, I have always said that apart from our own MPs, those of us in the North East don’t get much opportunity to meet with other politicians, so I changed my mind and said ‘yes’.  I am now glad I did so, and appreciate the opportunity given by CarersUK and CarersWeek.

The train journey down started really well with an unexpected turn of events. A young man sat a few seats from me and I recognised him as Chris Ramsey, stand-up comedian and actor from South Shields. Those that know me will not be surprised at my next actions, which was to start tweeting him. As most people travelling were using phones, he was unaware who was relating to his twitter  followers what he was doing. Once I identified myself we spoke a little while. Talk about Big Brother is watching. Thanks for the laugh Chris, you were a good sport.

After this light relief it was over to Westminster for the event. I was met by Carers Week staff and introduced to others from various organisations, including Age UK and Carers Trust. Then it was to business.

As a Carers UK member my companions were Emily Holzhausen, Director of Policy, and Chloe Wright, Senior Policy Officer. They took turns to sit with me. Also helping oversee the event was Steve McIntosh.

It was explained how the event would unfold. As MPs arrived they would be guided to tables to speak with carers, how long for was unsure, depending on if they had any other appointments they needed to attend.

I had no worries about speed networking. Those that know Geordies will know we talk fast. My main concern was how much ground could be covered when the issues surrounding carers are many. It was not just about my family’s’ circumstances, but many others out there too, struggling to cope on a daily basis.

We managed to see 8 MPs, names as follows –

Carers Week blogIan Mearns  Lab
Guy Opperman  Con
Norman Lamb  LibDem
Peter Aldous  Con
Sheila Gilmore   Lab
Grahame Morris   Lab
Stewart Jackson  Con
Caroline Lucas   Green

As well as outlining how caring has impacted on my family, other issues discussed were as follows.

1.    The issue of the Children and Families Bill and the lack of parent carer rights in it, and the concern that they would be left behind. We also talked about when the Care Bill comes to the House of Commons, to stop carers from being charged for their own services and to put an amendment, which would prevent family and friends’ support being taken for, granted.

2.    We discussed the impact of welfare reform on carers, in particular the bedroom tax

3.    The benefits system, which causes huge difficulties in trying to juggle work and care.

4.    Lack of services that are right for the people we care for, e.g. lack of dementia services and support for younger people.

5.    Lack of investment locally in carers’ support e.g. carer’s dementia work.

6.    Concerns about cuts to services and reassessments of severely disabled people and the impact on the caring support and family

7.    Concerned about the cumulative impact of different changes and cuts that are hitting families hard.

8.    Problems surrounding Employment Support Allowance process

9.    Impact on disabled people, as well as carers, re closure of Independent Living Fund.

10.   Advice and information being hard to come by but being vital.

11.  Importance of strong local advocates within local carers’ organisations.

12.  The level of Carer’s Allowance and the failure of this Government and the last Government to reform this benefit.

With thanks to Ian Mearns, Grahame Morris and Guy Opperman for the North East presence, to Norman Lamb who stayed longer than intended and was late for his next appt, and remaining MPs for the interest they showed, and the many questions asked.

Journey back took several hours and it was past midnight when I got home, extremely tired but an enjoyable day.

So, following on from the Carers Week theme of ‘I’m Prepared to Care’ – my question would be – What next?

Many of us have already been caring for as long as we can remember. Governments past and present have failed to fully address many of the carer issues.

We need action now

Give us the tools to assist us in our caring roles. It may be finances, respite, services, equipment, understanding from employers etc. Investing in us now can only strengthen the foundation we provide that prop up both NHS and Social Services.

We are ‘prepared to care’ 

 Is the government prepared to take ACTION?

Rosemary

Carers UK blog

WOW Petition – ***MASS TWEET – THURSDAY 6TH JUNE, 10.00AM, 1.00PM, 9.00PM***

5 June 2013

Copied from wow petition group

Hi all,

As you probably already know from twitter, facebook, or the blog, we’re organising a series of Mass Tweets for Thursday 6th June. We want to get WOW trending nationwide, to raise awareness of the campaign and get more signatures. You can help by tweeting using the #WOWpetition hashtag at 10.00am, 1.00pm and 9.00pm.

http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/43154

CLICK HERE TO SIGN

Note that twitter calculates trending on the number of original tweets, not re-tweets, so we need as many people as possible to tweet as many tweets as they feel able (fewer than 100 in an hour though, or you’ll end up in ‘twitter jail’ for a few hours and unable to tweet till you’re released) at those times.

If you’d like to help before Thursday, we’d be most grateful if you can inform your friends about the tweetathon via twitter, facebook, email. This blogpost is great to give people further details,

SEE FULL DETAILS HERE   INCLUDING EXAMPLES OF TWEETS THAT YOU CAN USE.

To join discussion on all aspects of welfare, please see here too.

The onslaught to carers and their families continues….

21 May 2013

The onslaught to carers and their families continues. Welfare cuts are starting to hit harder, bedroom tax, cuts to vital services, closure of Independent Living Fund. Benefits being changed all around and yet the lowest of them all, Carers… Allowance is once again ignored.

Invisible to use

Iain Duncan Smith only ‘reformed’ those benefits that could be cut and/or criteria tightened. He has failed carers, many of whom will be hit with a double whammy if the person they care for loses the qualifying amount of Disability Living Allowance.

The whole safety net of SOCIAL SECURITY is being stripped away.

It may not affect you now but it could do.

PLEASE SHARE IF YOU CARE ABOUT THE FUTURE OF DISABLED PEOPLE AND CARERS.

WRITE TO YOUR MP

http://www.writetothem.com/

Show the government that you care about Social Care

18 April 2013

Are you disabled, in ill health, a carer or know someone who is?

titanicCarerWatch members are extremely concerned about the impact of the Welfare Reform Act on Social Care. Not just on those people affected now,  but those that will be in the future.  It is vital we take every opportunity to raise our voices about these issues to government.

See below for details received of a new campaign – Britain Cares

show the

Received from Scope –

I wanted to let you in on a new campaign, Britain Cares – see website here

We all know how much support is being savagely taken away at the moment, but we think coming up there is a major opportunity to help get something positive to happen.

We believe that there is the potential for a big political moment to get the Government to address the growing crisis in social care for disabled people, with the Care and Support Bill coming into Parliament in May (one of only two major Bills) and the Government’s Spending Review brought forward to this June. We need to make a big push in April and May building up to June.

It could make a direct difference to the lives of more than 100,000 disabled people in this country through providing social care – but this campaign is also really about trying to galvanize wider public support for the rights of disabled people.

We want to take it to the Government and show them actually they’re wrong, many people in this country (disabled and non-disabled) believe in good, fair support for disabled people to live their lives.

At the same time, this campaign is about trying to show there are lots of people in Britain with shared values of fairness and freedom, and we want to live up to those values by making sure disabled people can live their lives like everyone else.

We want to challenge the Government by showing them.

There are two main ways to get involved:

– Upload a photo saying “I care!” or “We care!” at  www.britaincares.co.uk  where you can email it to your MP with a message

– If you have experience of the importance of social care yourself, please share your story with your MP – we urgently need to get them to understand more about the importance of social care against the backdrop of all the other cuts – further details to be found here

Please do have a look, it’s live online now and with a first big moment around 30 April,  to coincide with two All-Party Parliamentary Groups who will be coming out with their report on social care for working age disabled people.

If you’re interested and could help share/support in any way once it’s up and running, that would be enormously appreciated.

It’s not just a Scope campaign – other charities, organisations and others are getting behind it too, we want to make this as broad a church as possible.

You can contact Joe Hall at Scope for any more information or materials: joe.hall@scope.org.uk

Disabled people will be impoverished as they face a “Tsunami” of benefit cuts – says Inclusion Scotland

18 December 2012

Inclusion ScotlandDisabled people in Scotland face the impact of several simultaneous cuts to their benefits, say disability campaigners at Inclusion Scotland. They describe the affect as being akin to a virtual Tsunami which will devastate disabled people’s living standards causing hardship and homelessness. They say that the Department for Work & Pensions has refused to carry out a cumulative impact assessment of the effect of welfare cuts on disabled people forcing Inclusion Scotland to do their job for them.

Labour MP Ian Mearns has called for a debate in Westminster Hall which will take place on the afternoon of Tuesday, 18th December, on the effects of welfare reform on disabled people, their carers and families. This debate follows over a year’s campaigning by disabled people and carers who have worked hard to promote blind activist and carer Pat Onions’ petition asking the government to stop and review the cuts to disabled people’s benefits & services. In spite of restricted media coverage, “Pat’s Petition” collected over 62,600 signatures.

IS have analysed the changes using the DWP’s statistics and have calculated that the combined effect of the cuts planned under the guise of welfare “reform” will have a devastating impact on disabled people (who are more likely to rely benefits for some or all of their income than non-disabled people).

For example: (more…)


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