Evidence to Select Committee on Housing Benefit

Local Housing Allowance Reform Group

LHARG is a disabled people’s pressure group set up to campaign for fairness in making private rented sector housing affordable for the 2 million disabled people who rent in this sector. Of the 2 million disabled people who rent in the private rented sector many have additional disability related needs.

As well as being campaign co-ordinator for the Local Housing Allowance Reform Group I am also a trustee for Warwickshire and Coventry Council of Disabled People and their Executive Health and Safety Officer.

Linda Burnip, Campaign Co-ordinator Local Housing Allowance Reform Group.

I would very much appreciate the opportunity to give oral evidence to the committee on behalf of my members who have experienced a wide range of disability related problems through Local Housing Allowance legislation.

Summary

  • We welcome the changes to funding for an extra bedroom for a non-resident carer.

 

  • We feel that there are many aspects of disability related needs that have still not been considered within these proposals, and feel that these too should be addressed urgently to meet the human rights of disabled people.

 

  • We do not believe that the proposed changes to percentile rents or social housing tenure and sanctioning of rent levels will in any way help disabled people back into work.

 

  • We are concerned that the Equality Impact Assessment carried out in relation to these changes was inadequate and flawed. There has been no consideration of the negative impact of these changes on disabled people.

 

  • The proposed change are likely to increase homelessness amongst disabled people and/ or push them even further into poverty. Potentially these changes will deprive disabled people of their human right to live independently in the community. Moving especially across county boundaries is not an option which is available to disabled people in receipt of care funding.

 

  • While we welcome the increased funding for Discretionary Housing Payments there remain many problems with a system where disabled people have no automatic entitlement to adequate funding for sustainable and secure housing. Such payments must be available to disabled people on a long term basis to enable independent living and uphold human rights under the UNCRPD.

 

  • We do not feel that if homelessness and poverty amongst disabled people increases through these proposals that this will lead to a saving from the national purse, in fact the opposite is likely to be the result.

 

  • In their entirety we believe that these proposals if implemented will contravene the human rights of disabled people as enshrined in the UNCRPD, in particular articles 28, 19, 1 and 7.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Local Housing Allowance Reform Group

 

LHARG is a disabled people’s pressure group set up to campaign for fairness in making private rented sector housing affordable for the 2 million disabled people who rent in this sector. Of the 2 million disabled people who rent in the private rented sector many have additional disability related needs.

MAIN SUBMISSION

1. Changes to Size Criteria of Local Housing Allowance

 

1.1    While we are pleased with the only small positive changes to LHA from April 2010 put forward in the recent budget regarding additional funding for an extra bedroom for a live-in, non-resident, carer these changes still totally failed to address many other issues such as parents of disabled children who need an extra bedroom to care for their disabled child, pensioner and other couples who need an extra room due to their medical needs, and a wide range of other disability related factors which mean disabled people requiring extra housing space including the need for space for dialysis, room to store equipment, room to use a wheelchair, ground-floor and level  access accommodation still have not had these needs met.

1.2    The recent DWP Select Committee report from March   2010 (Fifth report of session 2009-2010, HC 235) into LHA said that these factors were posing considerable barriers to independent living and should be addressed urgently but still have not been.

1.3   In essence the proposed changes to LHA will simply increase these barriers, and from 2013 force disabled people renting in the social housing sector to face the same barriers in securing adequate, accessible and, adapted housing.

1.4   In some instances this still leaves cases where disabled children are unnecessarily being taken into care and cases where pensioner couples are being forced to choose between paying for housing costs or for care/support and if unable to afford both having to do without essential care/support.

1.5   There are 1.8 million people on social housing waiting lists. Currently 1 million children live in overcrowded households. Many councils are advising people to rent privately yet the planned changes will make this virtually impossible for disabled people to afford.

2. Percentile Changes to Local Housing Allowance

2.1   From October 2011 a number of very negative changes to Housing Benefits are planned: the stated aim of which is to force private sector landlords to reduce their rents, and to make work pay.

2.2   These proposed changes will constitute serious breaches of United Nations Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities particularly article 28, article 19, article 1, and article 7. As this has been ratified by our government new changes to our legislation should not be allowed to contravene these convention rights, or the European Convention on Human Rights.

 2.3    A survey by the Landlord’s Association has already shown that landlords will not reduce rents. Further it is very difficult for anyone in receipt of benefits, but especially disabled people, to find landlords willing to rent to them.

2.4     Only one in eight Housing Benefit claimants are unemployed the rest are elderly, disabled or in work. We therefore fail to see how reducing LHA rates to the 30th percentile will increase incentives into work in any meaningful way.

 2.5   From October 2011 the Local Housing Allowance will be set at the 30th percentile rent in each Broad Market Rental Area, rather then the 50th percentile as now. Disabled people will only be able to afford to rent in the cheapest properties in an area, which are more than likely to be inaccessible. These are also the areas where disability hate crime is more common and therefore will impact negatively on the physical safety of disabled people.

 2.6   The Equality Impact Assessment carried out by DWP on the percentile change and the effect on disabled people was totally inadequate as it failed to consider how many properties in the lowest 30th percentile rent band were in any way accessible or in what ways. It merely stated that the impact of these changes would be the same for everyone so it did not matter if disabled people were negatively affected. This EIA therefore fails to meet the current requirements of the DDA 2005 and neither does it meet the requirements of the Single Equalities Act in relation to meeting the needs of disabled people.

2.7   Currently 48% of people getting Local Housing Allowance already pay an average of an extra £23 per week towards their rent, from October those living in London will have to top up their rents by another £20-30 per week (average amount of reductions for London areas for 1 and 2 bedroom accommodation).

2.8   This will mean that for many disabled people the level of rent they have to pay will be at least £50-60 per week more than they receive in Housing Benefit. This will increase the difficulties disabled people face in finding suitable accommodation to live independently, increase homelessness amongst disabled people and push disabled people further into poverty

2.9   Research shows that 30% of disabled people already live well below the poverty line and that 1 in 4 families with disabled children can’t afford heating. 2.8 million households live in fuel poverty yet these plans will simply increase these figures.

2.10   As well as having physical needs relating to housing such as level access, enough space to turn a wheelchair many disabled people with a less severe mobility impairment need to be close to facilities like health centres, shops, busses which they can reach without having to walk too far. Those who are blind or partially sighted need to have consistency in their surroundings also.

2.11   Those with a learning disability need to be able to live in an area where they are known and feel safe and which they know well. It can take several years for someone with a learning disability to learn to find their way around a strange area or learn which busses to catch. Being able to remain in the catchment area of a GP who knows them and have continuing access to other health services, such as wheelchair services, is often vital for them.

2.12    Disabled people forced to move because they will not be able to afford to pay their rent will further, but very importantly, lose their care and support services. As I am sure you are aware care budgets are not transportable from one local authority area to another and the level of funding someone receives can fluctuate widely dependent on a postcode lottery. The staff they currently employ are also likely to be lost to them as most disabled people employ staff who live locally, and the amount of money disabled people receive to pay for their care is often too little to allow staff to be able to afford to travel to work.

2.13    Many disabled people living in the private rented sector have had expensive adaptations made to their properties, one of my members who has rented the same property for 9 years, for example, has had £20,000 of such adaptations but was told that if she was evicted it didn’t matter as once she was re-housed, after spending an indefinite length of time in much more expensive bed and breakfast accommodation, social services would pay for the same adaptations again.

2.14   Thus the impact of the budget changes to Housing Benefits for disabled people will result in many cases, particularly in London, in them being forcibly moved from their homes due to lack of adequate funding, losing their support services, and their trained PAs (carers) and all their other support services from social care and health authorities.

2.15    Disabled people do not, as Steve Webb said in a recent parliamentary debate, get £8,000 per annum in Disability Living Allowance and disability premiums to meet these needs. Any disabled person who has care funding provided through the Independent Living Fund  has to pay half of their DLA and all of their severe disability premium from income support towards their care costs(over £85 per week) and anyone in receipt of care from social services is only left with the basic income support level plus 25% in most instances. Thus any money disabled people are given by the state to meet the extra needs of being disabled is given with one hand and taken away rapidly with the other.

3. Caps on Housing Benefit levels

 

A new upper limit for LHA will be introduced

£250 a week for a one bedroom property

£290 a week for a 2 bedroom property

£340 a week for a 3 bedroom property

£420 a week for a 4 bedroom property

3.1    Disabled People’s Organisations in London however have raised concerns that as the centre of London becomes unaffordable to most disabled people then there will be additional pressures on local councils and private rented accommodation, for example in Brent where there is already a 10 year waiting list for re-housing, as more people are forced to move to outlying areas.

4.  Longer term reforms

4.1   The Chartered Institute of Housing has calculated that the cumulative effects of the coalitions proposals mean that by 2020 every tenants Housing Benefit will be too low to cover their rent.

4.2    Already poor disabled people will also disproportionately bear the brunt of increases in VAT introduced in the budget and the estimate is that the amount of VAT paid will increase by £500 per year per household.

4.3   From 2013-14 Local Housing Allowance rates will be upgraded in line with CPI (Consumer Price Index) rather than on the basis of local rents. Added to this the plans to link future benefit increases to CPI rather than RPI means that this too will increase poverty amongst disabled people.

4.4    From 2013 housing benefit for working age social rented sector customers will be restricted fro those who are occupying a larger property than their household size would warrant. This is something that the Labour government and DWP tried to introduce in Welfare Reform bill 2007 but were forced to drop by pressure from Housing Associations.

4.5   It means that if you are living in an adapted property which may have cost thousands of pounds to adapt then if you also have an extra bedroom you have no apparent current need for you will only get HB paid at the one bedroom rate. The only possible outcomes of this are an increase in the number of homeless disabled people, increasing poverty of disabled people and potentially disabled people being unable to continue to live independently in the community. This would both be more expensive and against the UNCRPD.

4.6    Time limiting Housing Benefit customers who are claiming Job seekers allowance will only receive their full Housing Benefit award for a period of 12 months. After that their benefit will be reduced by 10% and they will continue to be ineligible for the full out of work Housing Benefit rate until after they have left the benefit system and been in work for a period.

4.7   This fails to take into account the fact that disabled people who may be deemed fit for work through the failing Work Capability Assessments for ESA may be unable to get or to keep work due to the barriers disabled people face in working. Only 15% of adults with autism, for example, are in employment which is due entirely to the barriers they face and not because they are ‘workshy.’ Should disabled people with autism or who have fluctuating impairments such as IBD, ME, MS, or Parkinson’s Disease have their rents sanctioned because they cannot find and keep work through no fault of their own?

4.8   There are currently an estimated half million jobs for 6 million people looking for them, where are these imaginary jobs going to come from for disabled people, and what is being done to remove the considerable barriers to disabled people’s employment?

5.  Discretionary Housing Payments

 

5.1   One in four disabled people living in the social rented sector are trapped living in properties that are inaccessible to them. Their only other option is to live in the private rented sector due to a lack of available accessible properties.

5.2   Recognising the chaos their HB reforms are going to make the sum allocated by government for DHPs has increased by £10 million in 2011 and by £40 million in 2012. This will apparently give more flexibility to local authorities but DHPs are not supposed to cover long term housing costs and have to be applied for every 13 weeks. There is no right of appeal if they are refused although you can seek a Judicial Review.

5.3   Leicester City Council for example has now introduced a policy where they will only pay a DHP for a maximum of 13 weeks during which time disabled people getting are supposed to move to a cheaper property, regardless of their independent living needs, and the lack of alternative housing available.

5.4    Not paying DHPs for longer will neither prevent homelessness nor poverty amongst disabled people. Disabled people must have security of tenure and a stable and sustainable home if their human rights are to be met fully.

5.5    Leaving aside any moral issues regarding independent living for disabled people it is much more cost effective to allow disabled people to remain living independently in the community compared to the cost of residential care, bed and breakfast accommodation or temporary hostel places. Residential placements can cost well over £1,500 per week, temporary hostels over £350 per week.

Linda Burnip

Campaign Co-ordinator Local Housing Allowance Reform Group.

Additional articles regarding these cuts which are not disability specific.

Housing Benefit cuts condemned

Unions condemn HB cuts

http://www.insidehousing.co.uk/news/housing-management/unions-condemn-housing-benefit-cuts/6511018.article

Shelter condemns HB cuts

http://england.shelter.org.uk/news/june_2010/housing_benefit_warning

CAB condemns HB cuts

http://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/press_20100723

National Housing Federation condemns HB cuts
http://www.nhfdirectory.co.uk/news/171

Crisis condemns HB cuts

http://www.homelesspages.org.uk/node/24169

cuts in mortgage aid will lead to even more homeless disabled people
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2010/aug/09/mortgage-benefit-cuts-disabled-housing

CarerWatch support the LHARG evidence

Evidence from  Local Housing Allowance Reform Group

LHARG is a disabled people’s pressure group set up to campaign for fairness in making private rented sector housing affordable for the 2 million disabled people who rent in this sector. Of the 2 million disabled people who rent in the private rented sector many have additional disability related needs.

As well as being campaign co-ordinator for the Local Housing Allowance Reform Group I am also a trustee for Warwickshire and Coventry Council of Disabled People and their Executive Health and Safety Officer.

Linda Burnip, Campaign Co-ordinator Local Housing Allowance Reform Group.

I would very much appreciate the opportunity to give oral evidence to the committee on behalf of my members who have experienced a wide range of disability related problems through Local Housing Allowance legislation.

Summary

• We welcome the changes to funding for an extra bedroom for a non-resident carer.

• We feel that there are many aspects of disability related needs that have still not been considered within these proposals, and feel that these too should be addressed urgently to meet the human rights of disabled people.

• We do not believe that the proposed changes to percentile rents or social housing tenure and sanctioning of rent levels will in any way help disabled people back into work.

• We are concerned that the Equality Impact Assessment carried out in relation to these changes was inadequate and flawed. There has been no consideration of the negative impact of these changes on disabled people.

• The proposed change are likely to increase homelessness amongst disabled people and/ or push them even further into poverty. Potentially these changes will deprive disabled people of their human right to live independently in the community. Moving especially across county boundaries is not an option which is available to disabled people in receipt of care funding.

• While we welcome the increased funding for Discretionary Housing Payments there remain many problems with a system where disabled people have no automatic entitlement to adequate funding for sustainable and secure housing. Such payments must be available to disabled people on a long term basis to enable independent living and uphold human rights under the UNCRPD.

• We do not feel that if homelessness and poverty amongst disabled people increases through these proposals that this will lead to a saving from the national purse, in fact the opposite is likely to be the result.

• In their entirety we believe that these proposals if implemented will contravene the human rights of disabled people as enshrined in the UNCRPD, in particular articles 28, 19, 1 and 7.

Local Housing Allowance Reform Group

LHARG is a disabled people’s pressure group set up to campaign for fairness in making private rented sector housing affordable for the 2 million disabled people who rent in this sector. Of the 2 million disabled people who rent in the private rented sector many have additional disability related needs.

MAIN SUBMISSION

1. Changes to Size Criteria of Local Housing Allowance

1.1    While we are pleased with the only small positive changes to LHA from April 2010 put forward in the recent budget regarding additional funding for an extra bedroom for a live-in, non-resident, carer these changes still totally failed to address many other issues such as parents of disabled children who need an extra bedroom to care for their disabled child, pensioner and other couples who need an extra room due to their medical needs, and a wide range of other disability related factors which mean disabled people requiring extra housing space including the need for space for dialysis, room to store equipment, room to use a wheelchair, ground-floor and level  access accommodation still have not had these needs met.

1.2    The recent DWP Select Committee report from March   2010 (Fifth report of session 2009-2010, HC 235) into LHA said that these factors were posing considerable barriers to independent living and should be addressed urgently but still have not been.

1.3   In essence the proposed changes to LHA will simply increase these barriers, and from 2013 force disabled people renting in the social housing sector to face the same barriers in securing adequate, accessible and, adapted housing.

1.4   In some instances this still leaves cases where disabled children are unnecessarily being taken into care and cases where pensioner couples are being forced to choose between paying for housing costs or for care/support and if unable to afford both having to do without essential care/support.

1.5   There are 1.8 million people on social housing waiting lists. Currently 1 million children live in overcrowded households. Many councils are advising people to rent privately yet the planned changes will make this virtually impossible for disabled people to afford.
2. Percentile Changes to Local Housing Allowance

2.1   From October 2011 a number of very negative changes to Housing Benefits are planned: the stated aim of which is to force private sector landlords to reduce their rents, and to make work pay.

2.2   These proposed changes will constitute serious breaches of United Nations Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities particularly article 28, article 19, article 1, and article 7. As this has been ratified by our government new changes to our legislation should not be allowed to contravene these convention rights, or the European Convention on Human Rights.

 2.3    A survey by the Landlord’s Association has already shown that landlords will not reduce rents. Further it is very difficult for anyone in receipt of benefits, but especially disabled people, to find landlords willing to rent to them.
2.4     Only one in eight Housing Benefit claimants are unemployed the rest are elderly, disabled or in work. We therefore fail to see how reducing LHA rates to the 30th percentile will increase incentives into work in any meaningful way.

 2.5   From October 2011 the Local Housing Allowance will be set at the 30th percentile rent in each Broad Market Rental Area, rather then the 50th percentile as now. Disabled people will only be able to afford to rent in the cheapest properties in an area, which are more than likely to be inaccessible. These are also the areas where disability hate crime is more common and therefore will impact negatively on the physical safety of disabled people.

 2.6   The Equality Impact Assessment carried out by DWP on the percentile change and the effect on disabled people was totally inadequate as it failed to consider how many properties in the lowest 30th percentile rent band were in any way accessible or in what ways. It merely stated that the impact of these changes would be the same for everyone so it did not matter if disabled people were negatively affected. This EIA therefore fails to meet the current requirements of the DDA 2005 and neither does it meet the requirements of the Single Equalities Act in relation to meeting the needs of disabled people.

2.7   Currently 48% of people getting Local Housing Allowance already pay an average of an extra £23 per week towards their rent, from October those living in London will have to top up their rents by another £20-30 per week (average amount of reductions for London areas for 1 and 2 bedroom accommodation).

2.8   This will mean that for many disabled people the level of rent they have to pay will be at least £50-60 per week more than they receive in Housing Benefit. This will increase the difficulties disabled people face in finding suitable accommodation to live independently, increase homelessness amongst disabled people and push disabled people further into poverty

2.9   Research shows that 30% of disabled people already live well below the poverty line and that 1 in 4 families with disabled children can’t afford heating. 2.8 million households live in fuel poverty yet these plans will simply increase these figures.

2.10   As well as having physical needs relating to housing such as level access, enough space to turn a wheelchair many disabled people with a less severe mobility impairment need to be close to facilities like health centres, shops, busses which they can reach without having to walk too far. Those who are blind or partially sighted need to have consistency in their surroundings also.

2.11   Those with a learning disability need to be able to live in an area where they are known and feel safe and which they know well. It can take several years for someone with a learning disability to learn to find their way around a strange area or learn which busses to catch. Being able to remain in the catchment area of a GP who knows them and have continuing access to other health services, such as wheelchair services, is often vital for them.

2.12    Disabled people forced to move because they will not be able to afford to pay their rent will further, but very importantly, lose their care and support services. As I am sure you are aware care budgets are not transportable from one local authority area to another and the level of funding someone receives can fluctuate widely dependent on a postcode lottery. The staff they currently employ are also likely to be lost to them as most disabled people employ staff who live locally, and the amount of money disabled people receive to pay for their care is often too little to allow staff to be able to afford to travel to work.

2.13    Many disabled people living in the private rented sector have had expensive adaptations made to their properties, one of my members who has rented the same property for 9 years, for example, has had £20,000 of such adaptations but was told that if she was evicted it didn’t matter as once she was re-housed, after spending an indefinite length of time in much more expensive bed and breakfast accommodation, social services would pay for the same adaptations again.

2.14   Thus the impact of the budget changes to Housing Benefits for disabled people will result in many cases, particularly in London, in them being forcibly moved from their homes due to lack of adequate funding, losing their support services, and their trained PAs (carers) and all their other support services from social care and health authorities.

2.15    Disabled people do not, as Steve Webb said in a recent parliamentary debate, get £8,000 per annum in Disability Living Allowance and disability premiums to meet these needs. Any disabled person who has care funding provided through the Independent Living Fund  has to pay half of their DLA and all of their severe disability premium from income support towards their care costs(over £85 per week) and anyone in receipt of care from social services is only left with the basic income support level plus 25% in most instances. Thus any money disabled people are given by the state to meet the extra needs of being disabled is given with one hand and taken away rapidly with the other.

3. Caps on Housing Benefit levels

A new upper limit for LHA will be introduced
£250 a week for a one bedroom property
£290 a week for a 2 bedroom property
£340 a week for a 3 bedroom property
£420 a week for a 4 bedroom property

3.1    Disabled People’s Organisations in London however have raised concerns that as the centre of London becomes unaffordable to most disabled people then there will be additional pressures on local councils and private rented accommodation, for example in Brent where there is already a 10 year waiting list for re-housing, as more people are forced to move to outlying areas.

4.  Longer term reforms

4.1   The Chartered Institute of Housing has calculated that the cumulative effects of the coalitions proposals mean that by 2020 every tenants Housing Benefit will be too low to cover their rent.

4.2    Already poor disabled people will also disproportionately bear the brunt of increases in VAT introduced in the budget and the estimate is that the amount of VAT paid will increase by £500 per year per household.
4.3   From 2013-14 Local Housing Allowance rates will be upgraded in line with CPI (Consumer Price Index) rather than on the basis of local rents. Added to this the plans to link future benefit increases to CPI rather than RPI means that this too will increase poverty amongst disabled people.

4.4    From 2013 housing benefit for working age social rented sector customers will be restricted fro those who are occupying a larger property than their household size would warrant. This is something that the Labour government and DWP tried to introduce in Welfare Reform bill 2007 but were forced to drop by pressure from Housing Associations.

4.5   It means that if you are living in an adapted property which may have cost thousands of pounds to adapt then if you also have an extra bedroom you have no apparent current need for you will only get HB paid at the one bedroom rate. The only possible outcomes of this are an increase in the number of homeless disabled people, increasing poverty of disabled people and potentially disabled people being unable to continue to live independently in the community. This would both be more expensive and against the UNCRPD.

4.6    Time limiting Housing Benefit customers who are claiming Job seekers allowance will only receive their full Housing Benefit award for a period of 12 months. After that their benefit will be reduced by 10% and they will continue to be ineligible for the full out of work Housing Benefit rate until after they have left the benefit system and been in work for a period.
 
4.7   This fails to take into account the fact that disabled people who may be deemed fit for work through the failing Work Capability Assessments for ESA may be unable to get or to keep work due to the barriers disabled people face in working. Only 15% of adults with autism, for example, are in employment which is due entirely to the barriers they face and not because they are ‘workshy.’ Should disabled people with autism or who have fluctuating impairments such as IBD, ME, MS, or Parkinson’s Disease have their rents sanctioned because they cannot find and keep work through no fault of their own?

4.8   There are currently an estimated half million jobs for 6 million people looking for them, where are these imaginary jobs going to come from for disabled people, and what is being done to remove the considerable barriers to disabled people’s employment?

5.  Discretionary Housing Payments

5.1   One in four disabled people living in the social rented sector are trapped living in properties that are inaccessible to them. Their only other option is to live in the private rented sector due to a lack of available accessible properties.

5.2   Recognising the chaos their HB reforms are going to make the sum allocated by government for DHPs has increased by £10 million in 2011 and by £40 million in 2012. This will apparently give more flexibility to local authorities but DHPs are not supposed to cover long term housing costs and have to be applied for every 13 weeks. There is no right of appeal if they are refused although you can seek a Judicial Review.

5.3   Leicester City Council for example has now introduced a policy where they will only pay a DHP for a maximum of 13 weeks during which time disabled people getting are supposed to move to a cheaper property, regardless of their independent living needs, and the lack of alternative housing available.

5.4    Not paying DHPs for longer will neither prevent homelessness nor poverty amongst disabled people. Disabled people must have security of tenure and a stable and sustainable home if their human rights are to be met fully.

5.5    Leaving aside any moral issues regarding independent living for disabled people it is much more cost effective to allow disabled people to remain living independently in the community compared to the cost of residential care, bed and breakfast accommodation or temporary hostel places. Residential placements can cost well over £1,500 per week, temporary hostels over £350 per week.
Linda Burnip
Campaign Co-ordinator Local Housing Allowance Reform Group.

Additional articles regarding these cuts which are not disability specific.

Housing Benefit cuts condemned
 
Unions condemn HB cuts

http://www.insidehousing.co.uk/news/housing-management/unions-condemn-housing-benefit-cuts/6511018.article
Shelter condemns HB cuts
http://england.shelter.org.uk/news/june_2010/housing_benefit_warning
CAB condemns HB cuts
http://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/press_20100723
National Housing Federation condemns HB cuts

http://www.nhfdirectory.co.uk/news/171
Crisis condemns HB cuts
http://www.homelesspages.org.uk/node/24169

cuts in mortgage aid will lead to even more homeless disabled people
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2010/aug/09/mortgage-benefit-cuts-disabled-housing

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3 Responses to “Evidence to Select Committee on Housing Benefit”

  1. Mike Says:

    I am staggered by the draconian laws that are or may be introduced and the negative effects that it will leave on the most vulnerable people in society.

    Why is it that the rich want the poor to have even less than they already have in the way of financial security.

    This in my opinion, may well result in people taking their own lives. I personally have seriously contemplated this myself and keep running it over in my mind. I can’t help it, I get so depressed when I hear and see such weighty loads put upon us. I would just like to go to sleep.

  2. rosey Says:

    I cannot believe how this new government are treating us. I have worked and paid my taxes for over twenty years. Now I am ill I seem to be getting nothing in return for all the money I paid to them. I am made to feel like a scrounger when I am entitled to claim for help and assistance. I am extremely worried about this housing benefit 10% extra payment to find as I live below the breadline as it is. Where are we suppose to find this extra money? I cannot afford heating in the winter let alone rent. Does the government actually add up the figures of the benefit payments and how far they actually spread? I bet if they all left their ivory towers and had to live on benefits for a month they would have a much clearer picture of life on the breadline in modern day Britain. I am sure many benefit claimants would swap lifestyles.

  3. Carer Watch.com / Cuts Cuts Cuts Says:

    […] https://carerwatch.wordpress.com/evidence-to-select-committee-on-housing-benefit/ […]

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